• Women in Collision

     

    Julie Wadley

    Capricorn Member Elected Director for WA

    Jwadley


    Wadley's Panel Beaters

    What brought you into the collision repair industry and specifically your current business? My husband was a Panel Beater and wanted to work for himself. I had always worked in an office in accounting and customer service, so it was a natural transition to start our own business.

    How has the role of women in the collision repair industry evolved in recent years? I have seen more female apprentices coming into the trade and becoming fully qualified. They are well recognised by the industry particularly in colour matching in the paint section. Women are recognised for their valuable input from a female perspective. They say that behind every good man is a woman and particularly more so in our industry. It’s a team effort.

    Many women who work in the collision repair industry have a multi-role position (front of house, HR, payroll, accounts, etc.). Do you have multiple roles and if so, how do you manage this?

    I do have multi roles within the business as do most business owners. I focus on continual improvement and customer satisfaction. I work more on the business and have diversified to include written off vehicle inspection for the Department of Transport. I employ great staff in the business in their specialty areas. It is a challenge for any business to keep up with the latest repair methods and technology. We are all required to adapt and change our business model to accommodate the cars of the future; both men and women. Everyone needs to work collectively.

    What are the greatest challenges facing the collision repair industry in the near future? A business needs to specialise or diversify if they can and move quickly with changes that are constantly occurring in the latest vehicles and technology. Businesses need to keep on top of all the latest methods of repair and continual upgrading of equipment for all the different types of steel being used in today’s vehicles Continual training is an essential part of any business.

    What advances or exciting developments have you seen or foresee coming up in the collision repair industry?

    Driverless cars are coming but not for quite a while.

    What are the key pieces of advice you would give to young women who are preparing to enter the collision repair industry?

    If you are keen to work in the industry pursue the dream. Always try to start with work experience or pre-apprenticeship in the trade of your choice. We have female engineers, mechanics and spray painters. It would also be good to see more female panel beaters. With all the modern equipment it is not an issue of physical strength like it used to be.

    Where do you see the role of women in the collision repair industry going in the future?

    To work along side men as equals and that is already happening. There is a great deal of respect in our industry for the female technicians we employ both on the floor or in the office.

    What are the keys to ensure front of house runs smoothly and what impact does this have on workshop operations?

    On the floor we operate 1Q1 system and they all have I Pad’s to clock on and off the various jobs they are working on, that information is then reordered in the office for job costing. The first contact with the customer is the office, who deal with insurance companies, customers and assessors. The workshop relies on the office to source all the parts required from suppliers and any supplementary repairs to be approved. It is a team effort in the office and on the floor.

    What are your tips on delivering exceptional customer service?

    Deliver exceptional service and satisfaction. Go the extra mile and adapt to the customer’s needs. Listen to the customers and try to understand what they are going through. Their cars are very personal and at times a very emotional time for them when they have had an accident.

    What is your greatest business milestone/achievement?

    Being honoured with Life Membership of MTAWA and being recognised for my contribution to the industry that I am involved in.


    Tracey Dwyer

    Minarelliweb


    Minarelli Smash Repairs

    What brought you into the collision repair industry and specifically your current business?

    My husband's family have been in the collision repair industry for three generations so I've been around it since I was seventeen when I first met my husband. In 2006 we purchased Minarelli Smash Repairs and have been the proud owners for twelve years. Our focus spanning across the three generations is providing high quality repairs and outstanding customer service.

    How has the role of women in the collision repair industry evolved in recent years?

    I think more women are involved in the industry now particularly in management positions which is nice to see. We're great organisers. Social media has also created an avenue for us to connect through facebook groups and posts. This provides opportunities for women to interact with each other where it may not have been possible in the past. I have met several women in the industry through social media. It's nice to discuss industry issues and relate to other women who understand the current climate.

    Many women who work in the collision repair industry have a multi-role position (front of house, HR, payroll, accounts, etc.). Do you have multiple roles and if so, how do you manage this?

    I absolutely have many roles and the multi-tasking skills come in very handy. I am a lover of 'to do' lists which I work through in order of priority. It can definitely be a juggling act but thinking ahead helps to prepare and organise myself. I'm also not afraid to delegate when needed and am a big fan of team effort. Being able to work from home helps to get the job done also.

    What are the greatest challenges facing the collision repair industry in the near future?

    The relationship between repairers and insurance companies certainly requires major improvement. Repairers have been in an unfair position for far too long and it affects us all. For many customers their motor vehicle can be one of their main assets. For some it may be their only one. We spend money paying for insurance and maintaining the upkeep on our vehicles. If we are in the unfortunate event where our vehicle requires repairs, then we should have access to a system where the priority and focus is on repairing vehicles to the highest of standards and not on cutting costs to the point where the quality and safety is compromised. A fair and transparent system that allows for a level playing field for all I believe would improve the collision repair industry enormously. It's a challenge that has been overlooked for too long and sadly many repair shops have closed down as a result.

    A serious shortage of tradespeople in the industry is a problem that is extremely concerning and the situation is not improving. It's getting worse. If the issues discussed above were addressed and implemented then it would have a flow on effect and we would see an increase in tradespeople. The industry needs to be attractive and in the current state it just isn't unfortunately. 

    What advances or exciting developments have you seen or foresee coming up in the collision repair industry?

    The only advances that would really excite me is seeing the government regulate the industry as promised in 2014. The recommendations put forward as a result of the Parliamentary Inquiry in 2014 have still not been implemented.

    What are the key pieces of advice you would give to young women who are preparing to enter the collision repair industry?

    Surround yourself with good people in the industry that value integrity and care about what they do. Check out social media for facebook groups and pages. It's important to connect with others in similar situations. Find a mentor that you trust who can help with advice and always take opportunities to upskill.  Remember it's important to always be learning and improving regardless of how long you've been doing something.

    Where do you see the role of women in the collision repair industry going in the future?

    I definitely think it would be nice to see even more women in managerial positions. I interact with several women in the industry and even employ a female panel beater who has been with us for twelve years. At one stage we also had a female spray painter on the team. It was very cool having a female panel beater and spray painter. In saying this regardless of whether you're male or female what I really care about is the industry attracting people with integrity. Most of my colleagues and friends in the industry are male and I don't care what gender they are, as long as they care about doing the right thing for the industry. That's what matters most to me. 

    What are the keys to ensure front of house runs smoothly and what impact does this have on workshop operations?

    Firstly, organisation. If the front of house is organised then this definitely influences how efficiently the workshop runs. Of course things don't always go to plan so it's essential to have a plan B. You need to be able to think on your feet and adapt if the plan of attack changes. 

    Communication is also vital to ensure the smoothness of operations. Clear instructions ensures everyone knows what's going. It's important to communicate with staff and the customer to avoid any confusion. Being approachable to your team and customers is fundamental to open communication. All of these factors contribute to how successfully the workshop operates.

    What are your tips on delivering exceptional customer service?

    This is my favourite question and I could discuss customer service for hours because I genuinely love it. We always aim to make our business decisions based on integrity and without your customers there is no business so customer service is vital. My philosophy is a simple one of treating customers in a manner that matches what my expectations would be if I were in their situation. The customer comes first and my main tip is to treat a customer with care and respect. Do whatever you can within your power to ensure the customer experience is outstanding. Communicate clearly to ensure you and the customer are on the same page and they are informed.

    Delivering exceptional customer service requires an enormous amount of care and appreciation. You have to care about what you do and your customer. If you don't then how can you deliver service that is exemplary? We have all experienced poor customer service and any time I do I use it as a lesson on how not to run our business. We want our customers to leave knowing that we genuinely appreciate their support. 

    What is your greatest business milestone/achievement?

    I think it's a huge milestone to still be in business after twelve years, particularly in this industry. In 2017 our entire business premises was flooded with water from Cyclone Debbie. The damage suffered can even be felt today. To still be operating after this experience is definitely an achievement I am proud of. The damage caused by this cyclone was so enormous that many local businesses were unable to survive post cyclone which I find extremely sad.

    We also received an award last year from our local Chamber of Commerce for Excellence in Trade, Construction and Manufacturing. It was nice to be recognised within our local business community.

    My proudest achievement though was when I discovered the following review of our business online:

    "Attention Ladies and other who feel vulnerable when trying to find a 'safe' place to take your precious car. I took a rust job to Minarelli , after I asked true locals, "who did the best work and who could I trust"? Well... what an Oasis in an increasingly darkening world! Honest friendly people who do quality work and give honest assessments. Wow! I almost want to have an accident and go back just for the experience."



    Pikwah Seid (Jessie)

    jessiepromax

    Promax

    What brought you into the collision repair industry and specifically your current business?

    Interest in cars – I preferred to do up cars growing up, instead of playing with make-up and clothes. I was a mechanic, but then my husband bought a panel shop and asked me to run it, as he runs the mechanical shop in Blackburn. I decided it would be good to have a different role and try panel.

    How has the role of women in the collision repair industry evolved in recent years?

    I have not noticed a lot of change. I know there seems to be a lot of people not so interested in the industry anymore, so it is hard to get people to work in the panel industry. People seem to like the mechanical industry better. Many women who work in the collision repair industry have a multi-role position (front of house, HR, payroll, accounts, etc.). Do you have multiple roles and if so, how do you manage this? I work lots of extra hours, after everyone else has finished. It is very time consuming, as I do all roles including panel beating

    What are the greatest challenges facing the collision repair industry in the near future?

    It is hard to find employees and I see that only getting worse. Insurance work is hard to obtain especially for smaller shops. When a newer car comes in for a repair most of the time it is written off by the insurance companies. Parts to repair these cars are too expensive and makes it not viable to repair. Labour costs are too great also.

    What advances or exciting developments have you seen or foresee coming up in the collision repair industry?

    Technology is advancing quite quickly. The new equipment and measuring tools are very advanced now. Solar heating for spray booths and new paint technology with water-based paints is very interesting for me.

    What are the key pieces of advice you would give to young women who are preparing to enter the collision repair industry?

    Do lots of research, prepare to work hard and understand the industry. The benefits for women entering this industry is they are generally smaller and can access parts on the car easier. They can remove and refit faster then men. Women generally have a better eye for detail and are more likely to make sure the job has no errors before it is released to the customer.

    Where do you see the role of women in the collision repair industry going in the future?

    Personally, I don’t see many women coming into the trade as trades people. I see more women getting into air brushing or office work in this industry.

    What are the keys to ensure front of house runs smoothly and what impact does this have on workshop operations?

    Make sure your price is competitive and acceptable to the customer. Being organised and letting the people out back know what work is to be done. If everything is smooth at front of house the workshop operations will be happy and know what needs to be done.

    What are your tips on delivering exceptional customer service?

    Do little extras not expected by the customer, eg; Detailing work or extra touch-ups around the vehicle

    What is your greatest business milestone/achievement?

    Being in the industry for more than 10 years. I am self-taught in the panel industry, and I learn from every person I meet, and a lot of learning has been from employees over the years. I am still here after 10 years in a male dominated industry and still enjoying it. There are always new things to learn.


    Leah Cahill

    cahillleah


    Northside Smash Repairs

    What brought you into the collision repair industry and specifically your current business?

    Many years ago, I was employed by a large insurance company to coordinate the assessment of vehicles within the Motor Vehicle Accident Assessing Centre. During this period, I spent a lot of time asking questions of the many experts in the industry - assessors, repairers and industry advisors – to learn as much as I could. Over the course of that time, I met my now husband, who was (and still is) a successful, energetic and vibrant repair shop business owner. Not long after, I left the insurance company and transitioned into the world of small business. I was so excited about joining the NSRS team and found that I was able to transfer the skills and knowledge I had gained in my former role to my new one.

    How has the role of women in the collision repair industry evolved in recent years?

    Over the last 20+ years I have witnessed a significant shift from women taking on the ‘front of office’ role, to branching into the more traditional ‘male dominated’ roles. I see this only as a positive and very encouraging to women interested in pursuing a career in the industry. Women make up half the population, so it only makes sense that they have an opportunity to excel within any industry they choose. With that said, I am very much aware that within the collision repair industry, women are still underrepresented, and we could do better.

    Many women who work in the collision repair industry have a multi-role position (front of house, HR, payroll, accounts, etc.). Do you have multiple roles and if so, how do you manage this?

    I would say anyone working in small business has to multitask to some extent. Our technicians, estimators, managers and administrative staff all have been provided with learning opportunities to gain a thorough understanding of different aspects of the business and therefore can take on multiple jobs throughout the day. I find this keeps everyone engaged, motivated and connected and ultimately more satisfied by the variety of their role. I like to be organised, so taking on various roles and working through my daily schedule is very rewarding.

    What are the greatest challenges facing the collision repair industry in the near future?

    Technology! It blows my mind, thinking about the advancement of technology and how quickly the world is changing. But I also find it exhilarating. Future Proofing our business for the next wave of change is our key priority. This will be challenging and time consuming, but crucial. I know our people welcome change, which includes vehicular and general industry software advances.

    What advances or exciting developments have you seen or foresee coming up in the collision repair industry?

    The leadership team and I know there are plenty of exciting times ahead. There is untapped information that has not yet been introduced into our industry in Australia and a tonne of new ideas and training. Stay tuned!

    What are the key pieces of advice you would give to young women who are preparing to enter the collision repair industry?

    Connecting with a profession you love and are passionate about is key to any young person entering the workforce. If the collision repair industry is where your interest lies, the options are endless and can vary from apprenticeships, production, finance or management. I would recommend speaking to people – in particular women – within the industry to gain knowledge and create your networks. Seeking out a mentor is also crucial for navigating any workplace.

    Where do you see the role of women in the collision repair industry going in the future?

    Onwards and upwards. The collision repair industry would most definitely benefit from more women entering all areas of the business. I personally would like to see more women get out from the traditional administrative role and man the tools; become production managers; spray painters or whatever it is they set their mind to. From a management perspective, to be a smash repair owner you need to be a business owner, not the other way around. There are millions of business savvy woman who have an interest in the collision repair industry and have the business skills to run a successful business. In addition to our fabulous administration teams, NSRS currently employs a female qualified Head Spray Painter, a female Spray Painter Apprentice and recently have employed a female Production Manager.

    What are the keys to ensure front of house runs smoothly and what impact does this have on workshop operations?

    Great leadership is crucial. Organisation and open communication needs to start from the top, not just front of house. Empowering our people and providing simple but effective processes allows each person to believe in themselves and the roles they perform. This allows smooth procession throughout each department. Job clarification, detailed task lists and ongoing training allows our administration and estimating teams to set the platform for the entire repair process. We motivate our team by providing clear, simple and concise instructions to all our technicians to compliment the front end at all our sites. We like to lead by example and by respecting our colleagues and customers, working as one team and being our best day in, day out.

    What are your tips on delivering exceptional customer service?

    Listen to the customer. Make their life easy and offer simple solutions. Clear and concise communication is important to deliver an open and honest process and the flexibility to tailor needs to the individual. This attached with impeccable quality provides the best outcome.

    What is your greatest business milestone/achievement?

    I am fortunate to share my achievements with my business partner, Steve Davies. Accruing our Stafford and Brendale sites is definitely up there as a major highlight for us. We are immensely proud of all three sites and the fantastic team who help us run them. Our team, who embody the NSRS’s values, are passionate about their work and bring a high level of energy to their role every day. They are the face of our business and are critical to any achievement and success of the business.


    Kathy Nousias

    kathy1

    Oakleigh Panels Autobody

    What brought you into the collision repair industry and specifically your current business?

    My husband is a panel beater and we wanted to grow in the panel industry. The opportunity came up to purchase this panel shop. It was a well-established business, after 30 years and still operating, we saw it as a good opportunity for us.

    How has the role of women in the collision repair industry evolved in recent years?

    I have seen more women involved in the motor vehicle industry, especially in the parts side. Parts interpreters, Delivery drivers, Sales reps. Men are more receptive to women in the industry now, especially assessors. Previously they would only talk to the men in the shops, now I find they are ok to talk to women.

    Many women who work in the collision repair industry have a multi-role position (front of house, HR, payroll, accounts, etc.). Do you have multiple roles and if so, how do you manage this?

    I do numerous roles including, payroll, invoices, book keeping, ordering parts and dealing with insurance companies for claims, quotes etc. I find focussing on each task and completing it and being organised as well as have certain days to do each task. E.g. payroll, invoicing, book keeping.

    What are the greatest challenges facing the collision repair industry in the near future?

    Insurance Companies are the biggest challenge – having preferred repairers takes a lot of work away. Also, the expense of tools and equipment, obtaining information on dis-assembling and assembling vehicles, especially computerised cars. Electronics, sensors, cameras are all challenging, it is not just about panel beating and painting now, you also must know about computers and electronics.

    What advances or exciting developments have you seen or foresee coming up in the collision repair industry?

    New paint technology, computerised paint measuring equipment, as well as new technology in tools and equipment used for panel beaters. Generally, tools and equipment are advancing very fast in this industry.

    What are the key pieces of advice you would give to young women who are preparing to enter the collision repair industry?

    Be tough emotionally, have a strong personality. Be prepared for a lot of work pressures and pressure from people expecting a lot from you. Don’t be scared to get your hands dirty, and if you like to have nice nails this isn’t a good industry to get into. If you are passionate about the industry just jump in and give it a go.

    Where do you see the role of women in the collision repair industry going in the future?

    I see more women coming into the industry and being involved in more roles. There are a lot more opportunities for women, we would definitely look on taking a female apprentice if they are interested in the trade.

    What are the keys to ensure front of house runs smoothly and what impact does this have on workshop operations?

    Being efficient, able to multi task, be open minded and being able to take on more than one task at once. Be friendly, have fun and make sure you give customers exceptional service. If front of house is running smoothly and is in order it flows on to the workshop operations. This makes it easier on the trades people to be efficient and know what needs to be done.

    What are your tips on delivering exceptional customer service?

    Always keep customers happy and informed. Be friendly and understanding. Go that little bit extra to be helpful towards the customer. Make sure they leave with a smile.

    What is your greatest business milestone/achievement?

    Running a successful panel shop with my husband and seeing growth. Working with my husband and still smiling and enjoying the industry.


    Jodie Sampson

    jsampson

    Sampson's Car Repairs

    What brought you into the collision repair industry and specifically your current business?

    My husband Luke is a spray painter and his family have owned and operated Sampson’s Car Repairs since 1962. Luke’s is a third generation Sampson to own the business. We lived at the Sunshine Coast in Queensland when Luke’s Dad called to see if we’d move to Tamworth to work for them with the view of taking ownership down the track. We both worked at the shop for 6 years before taking the reins in 2016.

    How has the role of women in the collision repair industry evolved in recent years?

    This will be my 9th year being involved in the collision repair industry, I’ve seen women successfully carry out roles in this industry that would traditionally be held by men. We’re not just receptionist any more, we’re spare parts interpreters, car detailers, spray painters, managers, business owners etc….

    Many women who work in the collision repair industry have a multi-role position (front of house, HR, payroll, accounts, etc.). Do you have multiple roles and if so, how do you manage this?

    I do wear many hats within the business, business partner, customer service, accounts, marketing, advertising, payroll, parts ordering/checking. Since I started here, I’ve implemented procedures and process which make juggling all those jobs easier. Systems at work help maximize precious time when trying to attend school P & C meetings and events, carry out the role of club secretary for a local junior rugby league club and most importantly spending time with our two sons.

    What are the greatest challenges facing the collision repair industry in the near future?

    Insurance companies dictating to repair shops what they’ll be paid for jobs, where we can order parts from and where our customers are allowed to take their car to for repairs! We’re doing more work for less money to keep our customers happy.

    What advances or exciting developments have you seen or foresee coming up in the collision repair industry?

    I’ve seen things like the introduction of UV primer which speeds up processes in the paint shop. Anything that assists with getting the job done more efficiently benefits everyone involved in the process.

    What are the key pieces of advice you would give to young women who are preparing to enter the collision repair industry?

    Be confident in your abilities. Research and training – knowledge and know how are powerful tools. Aim high!

    Where do you see the role of women in the collision repair industry going in the future?

    I think women are much “braver” now than ever before and don’t hesitate when looking to take on any role that they are interested in no matter what the industry or job.

    What are the keys to ensure front of house runs smoothly and what impact does this have on workshop operations?

    Parts, parts, parts. This one thing that could put a job behind schedule in our shop is a parts delay. Order well in advance of a job arriving, follow up prior to a job arriving. Also, communication and managing the workflow, have an efficient book in system and regular consultation with workshop manager.

    What are your tips on delivering exceptional customer service?

    Go the extra mile with each and every job. Empathise with the customer’s situation and assist where possible to make the process hassle free. Explain the process, offer loan cars, keep them informed along the way, stick to time frames provided. Maintain a professional presence from the shop façade to the front reception area, to the workshop.

    What is your greatest business milestone/achievement?

    Winning the Tamworth Business Chamber’s 2018 quality business award for excellence in customer service in Motor Transport Sales/Service. That was a very nice accolade, a testament to our staff’s dedication and hard work, we put in a lot of hours to ensure our business’s reputation for quality stays intact.


    Jessie, Leah & Mel Sheldon

    sheldon


    Sheldon Paint & Panel

    What brought you into the collision repair industry and specifically your current business?

    Jessie – I had been approached by my current bosses who I have known for a long time and had been offered an adult apprenticeship as a spray painter, based on them knowing that I am a hard worker and love a challenge.

    Leah – I have always been into cars, so I started an apprenticeship as a spraypainter. My job is my passion, I still get excited to go to work, so when the business came up for sale, I jumped at the opportunity.

    Mel – I first started as a car detailer and then went to Parts Interpreting for many years, which included going to smash repair shops to quote on the parts. I was then offered a job at a smash repair shop doing different roles and I’m still loving it!

    How has the role of women in the collision repair industry evolved in recent years?

    L: It has evolved from office accounting to major roles as tradespeople in both panel and paint, workshop managers, quoting on repairs, all just proving that we are all equal, and with the right training, everyone is capable of succeeding.

    J: I think women in general have proven over the ages that they can be just as good or even better in the industry. We have been recognised as competitive, hardworking and loyal employees, and that’s what employers want!

    M: I believe that it is quite common now for women to be in this industry and is also more accepted

    Many women who work in the collision repair industry have a multi-role position (front of house, HR, payroll, accounts, etc.). Do you have multiple roles and if so, how do you manage this?

    L: I am the owner, spraypainter, workshop manager and I find my position easy as I have been in this trade for over 30 years. It has become second nature to read how things should happen. It also helps having a great skilled team.

    J: I’m not so much in a multi-role position, however I do chip in to help both the panel shop and office when needed, which is a great way to learn most aspects of running these businesses in the industry besides just the paint side of it.

    M: I am the office manager for this business which includes general office duties, payroll, BAS, Job cards and organising weekly bookings, an also includes quoting on jobs and sourcing parts. I manage b setting goals for myself so I can achieve what is put in front of me.

    What are the greatest challenges facing the collision repair industry in the near future?

    L: I am finding that skilled tradespeople in remote or country areas are becoming fewer as mining jobs tend to attract the younger generation, and as the industry moves forward with technology, it needs to encourage new blood into the trades so it can move forward.

    J: Finding and keeping skilled tradespeople/apprentices! The industry is a low paying one, so a lot of people tend to go for a higher paying trade.

    M: Skilled employees will continue to be the biggest challenge of the industry, and believe it is one of many, low paid trades.

    What advances or exciting developments have you seen or foresee coming up in the collision repair industry?

    L: Having been in the trade for many years, I have seen so many advances. Starting my apprenticeship with acrylic and enamel, look at the industry now! Waterborne technology, colour tools, computerised laser measuring, estimate programs, it can only get better!

    J: Technology changes all the time! PPG for example have just revamped their range of products which keeps us on our toes! Waterborne seems to be the future in refinishing which is fantastic.

    M: Technology has changed a lot from years ago and believe it is only going to move forward to make the job easier and make the trades person more efficient.

    What are the key pieces of advice you would give to young women who are preparing to enter the collision repair industry?

    L: If you’re excited about it, do it! This is one of the industries where you get to feel proud of the finished product.

    J: If you have a passion for anything in the automotive industry, give it a go! It is rewarding at the end of the week seeing me old bunky car rolling out, back to its former glory!

    M: Believe in yourself, "You've got this!"

    Where do you see the role of women in the collision repair industry going in the future?

    L: Being more and more accepted these days, they can only move forward to all areas of the industry.

    J: We are going to take over the world!! HaHa! I have already seen an increase in female apprentices through my years in the trade, which is a good sign of where women are going in the future.

    M: It can only move forward as we are proving ourselves more and more.

    What are the keys to ensure front of house runs smoothly and what impact does this have on workshop operations?

    L: A skilled office manager that communicates and has the knowledge to do all the tasks required, they keep everyone in a job!

    J: Communication! I think this is the main key. A day’s plan can change multiple times, and keeping the team in the loop definitely helps productivity run smoothly.

    M: I basically treat people how I would like to be treated. Keeping customers informed goes a long way and also keeping all staff informed of what is happening because, after all, "we are a team!"

    What are your tips on delivering exceptional customer service?

    L: Always go out of your way to listen to what your customer expects from you and keep in contact with them on any change to their job.

    J: Understand what your customers expect from you! Doing that little bit of extra effort can go a long way, like a full brush touch before a job goes, is little effort for us, but is highly appreciated by the customer.

    M: Listening, communication, understanding and also to give customers more than what they expect!

    What is your greatest business milestone/achievement?

    L: Having two apprentices over the years that have represented WA in World Skills and having a successful business with a great group of people I am proud to call my team.

    J: Well, first as an apprentice, it was making the week without having to repaint a job! HaHaHa! But really, getting this job and becoming a tradesperson and loving every bit of it, is a milestone for me! Finding something like this that I wish I had done 15 years ago, and I could do this for ever!

    M: Well, that I am still excited about my role in the business and talking to people, but most importantly having a great team to work with is a great achievement I think!


    * The contents of and any opinions contained in this article may not necessarily reflect the opinions of Capricorn Society Ltd.